Believing Bubba Watson Wins 2012 Masters

“You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven” (Matthew 5 14-17).

As much as I’m dubious of “Celebrity Christianity” (and “Rock Star Preachers”), isn’t the testimony in the article linked above refreshing!? In this day of boorish, over-celebrated, above-the-law, self-absorbed, sin-glamorizing, and pathetic sports role models we see this glimmer of hope. As much as I think it can be dangerous to look at people instead of Jesus, sometimes I think it is OK to look at people who are trying to look like Jesus. As long as we don’t take our focus off of Him.

Yes, I’m a golfer (OK, I play golf). Yes, I watched the 2012 Masters (Confession time: I even taped it since I was traveling to see family and celebrate the Easter season). And, yes, I was pulling for Bubba. But I didn’t really know why until now. I love the way he plays; no lessons – all imagination and talent but with an air of calmness, grace, and class. That much I always noticed. But this completely changes things for me. Now I see Bubba for what he professes to be; a light! I should have known…he acted like someone who claimed the name of Christ.

When Bubba (he’s the kind of guy that you just want to call by his first name even though you’ve never met him), before donning the green jacket, was interviewed in the famous Butler Cabin after his historic win, commentator Jim Nance asked him, “Did you ever have this as a goal?” The winner of the world’s greatest golf tournament emotionally said, “No, no way. This is such a blessing.” From this article it appears that his goal is so much bigger than any milestone or match. Bubba, it seems, desires to show people the light of Christ more than anything else .

Part of me wishes that he wins so often that people would take greater notice of his character. But I’m afraid they would only relish his talent. They would mostly be watching to see him miraculously hook his hooded wedge off the pine needles on to a seemingly impossible-to-hit green for another major championship. That’s just the way we are bent. So the other, larger part of me hopes that, above all, golfing champion Watson achieves his goal of being a reflection of the brilliant light of Jesus. That makes him a true victor, in the most profound sense, whether he wins another golf tournament or not.

We live in a dark world and true followers of Jesus, famous or not, need to take the lid off the shining work Jesus is doing in our lives. For we are  called to be “children of God without blemish in the midst of a crooked and twisted generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world” (Philippians 2:15). So I think we would all do well to have these same priorities: Jesus first and everything below Him in its right order. God before golf…or anything else. Then will we sparkle in such a way that the only explanation is the transforming work of the One called the Light of the World. As Jesus said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12). So let us glorify Him by being the light He has called us to be.

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House churches growing along Texas-Mexico border | Believe It or Not | a Chron.com blog

Believe it or not? Of course there are House Churches (HC’s) on the Mexican border. They are everywhere. George Barna, by his broad definition, claimed there were 30,000 HC’s in the US in 2009, with a possible participation of over 30,000,000. And that number most certainly has increased since then. Mainline Protestants (and Catholics) have often chosen to stick their head in the proverbial sand and act as if people aren’t in a mass exodus from traditional churches. They may claim the organic church movement is happening overseas, the 10-40 Window maybe, but not here. “No way,” they would say. But they are very, very wrong!

I’m not a missiologist but the trend is obvious. Mainline denominations were once the face of American Christianity yet we have observed their implosion and demise for some time. First, many fled (and are still fleeing) to non-denominational community or Bible churches. This is where we see the majority of mega-churches in America today. But another movement is afoot and has been for years. People hungry for intimacy, community, and a fresh, less institutionalized expression of their faith are migrating to houses, cafes, coffee houses, and other venues unlike commonly seen church buildings. In a sense, the American church is going underground.

I’m not saying this is totally good or totally bad. I’m just reporting the facts. So why this flight away from the more common forms of the visible church to small, less formal and structured gatherings? Don’t laugh, but I’m going to cite Wikipedia. Although not always accurate or unbiased, I found its description of HC’s to be helpful. You can read the entire article at House church – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Here is a section that will explain some elements of this phenomenon and I will leave you to draw your own conclusions and vote in the poll at the bottom of this post:

“Christians who meet together in homes usually do so because of a desire to return to basic Church meetings as found in the New Testament. The New Testament shows that the early Christian church exhibited a simplicity of fellowship and interactive practice that is typically not the case in conventional denominations. They believe that Christians walked closely with each other, in close fellowship, sharing their lives in Christ together. This is expressed by 50 examples of the phrase “one another” found in the New Testament. Some Bible passages that indicate the atmosphere of early church life include:

Lifestyle

“They were continually devoting themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer.” (Acts 2:42 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

Participatory meetings

“What is the outcome then, brethren? When you assemble, each one has a psalm, has a teaching, has a revelation, has a tongue, has an interpretation. Let all things be done for edification.” (1 Cor. 14:26 [NASB]; see also Colossians 3:16, Hebrews 10:24–25)

Meeting in homes

“Aquila and Prisca greet you heartily in the Lord, with the church that is in their house.” (1 Cor. 16:19 NASB; see also Acts 20:20, Romans 16:5, Colossians 4:15, Philemon 1:2).

Networking through ‘Extra-local, Itinerant Ministries’

“After some days Paul said to Barnabas, “Let us return and visit the brethren in every city in which we proclaimed the word of the Lord, and see how they are.” (Acts 15:36 NASB)

Occasional Large Group Meetings

“I did not shrink from declaring to you anything that was profitable, and teaching you publicly and from house to house” (Acts 20:20 NASB)

Jesus model

” For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them.” (Matthew 18:20 [NIV])

Leadership

Some assemblies have a conventional leadership structure; others have none. A commonly held belief in the modern-day house church “movement” is that the Protestant Reformation did not go far enough to demonstrate a New Testament belief in the “priesthood of all believers” and that Jesus Christ alone is the Head of the Church, and the believers the body. The absence of hierarchical leadership structures in many house churches, while often viewed by the Protestant church at large as a sign of anarchy or rebelliousness to authority, is viewed by many in the house church movement to be the most viable way to come under true spiritual authority of love, relationships, and the visible dominion of Jesus Christ as Head of his own bride (i.e. the church). This does not mean that they reject all leadership, however. Many house churches develop elders and deacons who serve the members. Some house churches also accept ministry from church planters and itinerant workers whom they consider to be apostles.

Meeting format

Many house church gatherings are free, informal, and sometimes include a shared meal. Participants hope that everyone present will feel free to contribute to the gathering as and when they sense the leading of the Holy Spirit to do so. Leadership structures range from no official leaders, to a plurality of appointed elders. There is a deliberate attempt within most house churches to minimize the leadership of any one person. Having a lone pastor is generally considered unscriptural and such meetings prefer an openly plural responsibility of leadership.”

So what do you think?


“When he was at the table with them, he took bread, gave thanks, broke it and began to give it to them. Then their eyes were opened and they recognized him, and he disappeared from their sight. They asked each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked with us on the road and opened the Scriptures to us?”  They got up and returned at once to Jerusalem. There they found the Eleven and those with them, assembled together and saying, “It is true! The Lord has risen…” (Luke 24:30-35).

Only Dr. Luke records this post-resurrection event. Two downcast disciples of Jesus are leaving Jerusalem and returning to their home in Emmaus. They share with their unrecognized Lord how great their crucified Master was. Yet they could not veil the disappointment that their hopes that He was “the one who was going to redeem Israel” (Luke 24:21) had vaporized. “After all,” they said, “it has been 3 days since His death.” Jesus’ response was loving but stern: “How foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Did not the Christ have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” (Luke 24:25-26). Then He patiently explained that these events were the fulfillment of the Law and the Prophets and that Scripture had pointed to Him from the beginning (v. 27). And when they understood, they rushed back to Jerusalem with a renewed sense of enablement.

These followers of Christ were still living in the past, choosing to dwell upon Friday’s seemingly tragic events. They had been told that he was alive (v. 22-24) but, with their faith shattered and their heads staring down at the dirt road, they solemnly trudged home to their former life back in Emmaus. But they weren’t alone. Peter, along with some of the other disciples, had essentially done the same thing. Jesus had called them to be “fisher’s of men” but where did He find them after He had come victoriously from the grave? Fishing! For fish (see John 21:1-14)! Defeated by their failure to be faithful during Christ’s suffering and hopeless and helpless without the leadership of their Captain, they had returned to the same purposeless way of life they knew before they met Jesus. But upon seeing their risen Lord they made a mad dash to greet Him (John 21:7-8).

This season we celebrate Easter and Jesus’ expression of His continued presence with us, power in us, peace for us, and purpose through us that is clearly demonstrated by His resurrection. In the 40 days (Acts 1:3) before He ascended to the right hand of the Father He continually reminded His followers of those 4 things and made clear statements regarding each (see Matthew 28:16-20; Luke 24:36-49; John 21:15-19; Acts 1:1-11). All of this became a reality for His disciples as they waited in Jerusalem (the very place many had left following His crucifixion) for these promises to be fulfilled by the manifestation of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. In other words, it was after Easter that the full impact of His resurrection was most realized in His followers and they, moving forward, led lives that demonstrated His continued presence, power, peace, and purpose. Just read the book of Acts for the dramatic aftermath.

My point? Let us not lose the inertia of our Easter worship and festivities. Many of us will be stirred by exhilarating music, emotional “Passion Plays,” and motivating sermons. But our experience of the profundity of His resurrection is not meant to end there. The influence of His resurrection is to be something that propels us all year around, day by day, moment by moment. Let us not, like these disciples, return to the routine of a former, spiritually trivial life, but let us be continually transformed by the “fellowship of His sufferings and the power of His resurrection” (Philippians 3:10). May His presence, power, peace and purpose in and through us not fade after the invigorating crescendo of our Easter activities and focus. Instead, may our hearts continue to “burn within us” with an all-consuming passion that can only come from the ongoing sufficiency that His resurrection guarantees.

Let Jesus’ truth resonate with us: “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies;  and whoever lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” (John 11:25-26). Do we? Then let us be transported by the truth that His resurrection is to be experienced not just on a holiday but every day before and after. Let us not live like He is still dead. Let us not revert to the old passionless, mundane ways that we rose above during this sacred season. Let us magnify Him through His presence, power, peace, and purpose…even after Easter!


This an excerpt from my book “Captivated by Christ: Focusing on Him.” It can be found on virtually any on-line bookstore in both hardcopy and digital formats.

First Peter 1:3 exclaims, “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.” In other words, Christ’s all-powerful and glorious resurrection gives us more than a future hope; it gives us a living hope. The Lord’s death and resurrection created for us a transforming power that goes beyond His ability to raise us from the physical grave. It provided a power that can energize and give purpose to daily life.

Paul said, “I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection and the fellowship of sharing in his sufferings, becoming like him” (Philippians 3:10). In saying this Paul affirmed the predictive words of Jesus: “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies” (John 11:25). What Paul is saying is that the resurrection empowers us to experience supernatural living now as well as eternal life in the future. In other words, the reality of physical death being overcome by eternal life through that all-important resurrection victory has real spiritual connotations for living.

Paul explains further: “I consider everything a loss compared to the surpassing greatness of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them rubbish, that I may gain Christ” (Philippians 3:7-8). What did he primarily lose? Himself! What did he gain? Christ and the power of His resurrection! That’s why he tells the Roman Christians, “If we have been united with him like this in his death, we will certainly also be united with him in his resurrection” (Romans 6:5). This is a more important part of the Gospel than many give it credit for.

You see, in order to experience the power of the resurrection we must die physically and spiritually, literally and figuratively, now and in the future. You can’t be physically resurrected unless you physically die and you can’t live in spiritual resurrection power unless you die spiritually to self. This involves transitioning from our old self-oriented person to one whose focus is now on Christ. Then, through faith, we experience His resurrection power and presence. Paul elaborates: “I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. The life I live in the body, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me” (Galatians 2:20).

You see, when Paul talks about many of his travails, he considers the resurrection the root of his endurance and hope. The resurrection does give Paul hope that he’ll live with Christ in Heaven, but additionally it gives meaning to his life. In First Corinthians 15:30-32, as he connects his dying to self with the power of the resurrection, Paul says, “And as for us, why do we endanger ourselves every hour? I die every day—I mean that, brothers—just as surely as I glory over you in Christ Jesus our Lord. If I fought wild beasts in Ephesus for merely human reasons, what have I gained? If the dead are not raised, “Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.” In short, he has gained everything in Christ because of the fact of the resurrection. Without it, life is worthless.

Understand that without the power of the resurrection, our living (and dying) is in vain. First Corinthians 15:14, 17 clarify: “And if Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith. And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins.” Our lives in Christ become meaningful and powerful only when we see the glorious ramifications of the resurrection. That happens only when we “die to self” and all things become secondary to His will and glory. This means that we forsake self-determination and self-absorption. Instead we live in the power of His presence and are guided by His purposes instead of our own (Philippians 3:7-8).

My prayer is that God will give me the desire to daily die so that I might live in Him and the power of His resurrection. After all, “What you sow does not come to life unless it dies” (1 Corinthians 15: 36).


Great thoughts for Good Friday!

J.S. Park



Since the resurrection of Jesus Christ really happened, then

1) there’s a heaven, and a hell.

2) we do have victory over sin, now.

3) what we do matters in eternity.

4) we have forgiveness before an all-holy, fearsome, awesome, all-consuming God.

5) we will also be resurrected.

6) every word in the Bible is true.

7) Jesus is everything he said he was, and is.

8 ) everyone else who isn’t following Christ has it wrong.

9) death is not the end. Love awaits.

10) we have to get the good news out.

11) Jesus is coming back for us.

12) the actual Spirit of God lives in those who follow Him.

13) one day all evil will end.

14) a lot of stuff we think that matters doesn’t really matter.

15) miracles can happen.

16) he died for you and for that neighbor you can’t stand.

17) pride…

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“Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die. Do you believe this?” (John 11:25-26).

Many of you are familiar with is what commonly referred to as “the seven ‘I am’ statements of Jesus.” They are pregnant with meaning about who Jesus is and who He claimed to be. Simultaneously they create awe and bring us great comfort. Here is a list of them as they appear in the Gospel of John:

“I am the bread of life” (John 6:35, 6:48)

“I am the light of the world” (John 8:12, 9:5)

“I am the door” (John 10:7).

“I am the good shepherd” (John 10:11-14).

“I am the resurrection and the life” (John 11:25).

“I am the way, the truth and the life” (John 14:6).

“I am the true vine” (John 15:1,5).

Given this is the Easter season, I would like to focus on the 5th of these: “I am the resurrection and the life.” To understand this we must look at the context (Isn’t this always the case?). In John 11 we see what appears to be a tragedy. Mary and Martha’s brother, Lazarus, is dying. They send a message to Jesus telling Him of his sickness (11:1-3). Jesus was not startled but quickly told His disciples this illness was not going to end in death but ultimately demonstrate His own glory (11:4).

Strangely, the Great Physician tarried for 2 days without going to Lazarus’ bedside. By the time He decided to go (11:7) his friend had perished (11:11, 14). He arrives at a grieving household, making his entrance with the claim that Lazarus will be miraculously raised from the dead after 4 days (11:23). And on what basis did He make this claim? He tells them plainly, “I am the resurrection and the life.” He points to Himself – not the dire situation, the suffering family, or the stench of the deteriorating body. He says, “I am!!” He has the authority to overcome death and life and soon proves it (11:43:44). Based upon the command of Christ – “Lazarus, come out” – the dead man lives.

I could go on about the implications of this event in light of our being born again or regenerated. How dead men don’t make decisions and the power of God alone awakens us from our spiritual death (see Ephesians 2:1-10 if you want to examine the correlation) but I choose to focus on the physical aspect of this display of God’s power through the glory of the Son. As Jesus said to Martha, “Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die.” And I believe this is true both spiritually and physically.

As we celebrate Easter, Christ’s willful death and eventual rise from the grave, it makes us ponder a painful reality of living in a fallen world; physical death. It is all around us and, as we age and have more experiences in life, we know that inevitably it will be our turn. If we don’t die from a terrible disease or accident, our bodies waste away, slowly eroding through toil and the passage of time. We have also lived through the grief of loved ones passing away, just like in this story. And their death and the prospect of our own can create an ominous outlook that begins to shape our thinking and our living.

The good news? Jesus is telling and showing us here in John 11 that through faith in Him we can physically live forever. Oh yes, His children will die an earthly death, but it is a transport not a termination. Because of His mercy and might, He will once again shout “come forth” to all those who believe and we will be raised and given new bodies (for more than a dash of comfort and hope, see 1 Corinthians 15:50-57). We will be healed and whole, spiritually and physically, for all of eternity. And we will be forever joined with Jesus and family and friends that have put their trust in Him, the Lord over death and life.

Do you believe? This is what Christ requires. This is what He told Martha – whoever believes in him, though he will die, will live on in Heaven – and this is what He is telling us. This Easter I urge you to surrender to Him so that what we celebrate, Jesus’ resurrection, will guarantee that His victory over the grave has been applied to you by His grace and faith.

If you don’t understand what all this means, please send me a note and I will gladly follow up with you. Or reach out to a trusted follower of the risen Jesus and ask them to help you. I’m sure they, like me, will be thrilled to do so.


Just another sad example of being so “relevant” that the true message of the Gospel is buried under gimmicks and gadgets. Friends, the Gospel and God’s undiluted Word is always relevant…He doesn’t need the assistance of these kind of props.

A Twisted Crown of Thorns ®

Well you probably think I am kidding. Where in scripture and church history do we find stripper poles being erected in the sanctuary in church during worship and preaching of the word? Well…

A local pastor said he put a stripper pole on his pulpit to help preach his message.It may raise some eyebrows, but Pastor Mike Scruggs said he’s hoping it will save some marriages.Scruggs admits he’s anything but a traditional pulpit preacher.”We try to make it relevant, straightforward.

We don’t sugarcoat anything,” he said.On Friday, Scruggs’ sermon series drew a packed house at the Light of Word Ministries on Colerain Avenue.”We talk about sex. We talk about drugs. We talk about faith. We talk about relationships…, things that people are dealing with on a day-to-day basis,” Scruggs said.The series of sermons is called the “Battle of the Sexes,” with some rather interesting visual props.”On one side, (we’ll have)…

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City banishes Bibles during ‘gay’ fest

Have you ever heard of a “biblical homicide?” You know, where someone who was bludgeoned to death by a literal, physical Bible. Although it calls itself “a sword” (Hebrews 4:12) the canon of Scripture, unless it is so convicting that one’s conscience can’t handle its truth, is not a WMD!

Is this not stereotypical intolerance? Is this not an infringement of both freedom of speech and religion? Of course it is! But that is what America is coming to. But fear not – this is exactly what God’s Word has predicted. Are we shocked? We shouldn’t be. The message of the prophets rings loud and clear and has current relevance. I’ll leave the research to you – Scripture, even Jesus’ own teachings, clearly warns us of the apostasy and twisted logic of the last days.

So why is the Bible so dangerous? Because it is “the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart.” Yes, it caresses and comforts but it also cuts. It does spiritual surgery and exposes the cancer of our rebellion and sin. It tells us the truth about who we are and the way we live. It makes us embarrassingly naked before a holy God.

But it is also called the Good News. Because it is. It offers hope and freedom and salvation from ourselves and our sin. And this is all the more reason the “love letter from God” shouldn’t be banned from any place – no matter how dark, no matter how much it pierces our conscience or conflicts with our self-absorbed tendencies.

I’m not afraid of the Koran or the Satanic bible, nor do I think they should be barred from the marketplace of free speech and the public domain. So what is the big deal? They are only a threat if they are right and what you believe is wrong. Then they become “dangerous” and worthy of expulsion.

Think about it!


This Is the Image of Jesus Christ Gracing the Cover of Newsweek | TheBlaze.com

“For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God. For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies. For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees? But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience” (Romans 8:18-25).

The article above blatantly begs for some comments and questions. It is obviously a very postmodern take on Christianity. The message? If you are going to be a follower of Christ, do as He did and live as He lived…but keep it to yourself. Christianity must be confined to religious gatherings and private residences and is not to interfere with the public domain of politics, education, government, and society at large. Although it’s silly to think that following Jesus wouldn’t impact the way we engage all of life, culture, and creation, this gives us pause. Is God primarily interested in redeeming His creatures (people), our culture, or His creation?

First, let me say, I believe He is in the process of redeeming all of them. This is what Paul is saying in the passage above. God’s creation is in bondage in the same way unredeemed sinners are. This passage tells us that God’s chosen and His creation will ultimately be freed from the futility and slavery of their corruption. We live in a fallen world filled with fallen people but a day of final reconciliation and redemption is coming. God created all things. When humanity disobeyed, all things He created fell and were marred by sin. Therefore, eventually, He will redeem and restore all of His creation to its original beauty and perfection. And, according to Paul, this is a critical part of our hope and we are urged to wait patiently for it in unseeing faith.

The Apostle further elaborates in Colossians 1:15-20:

“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross” (Colossians 1:15-20).

So in both passages we see God’s purpose to redeem, restore, and reconcile “all things” to Himself is larger in scope than just personal salvation for human beings. In a broader sense, the mission of God in Christ is to reconcile everything back to Himself for His own glory. But how does this happen? By the cross and the shed blood of Jesus (Colossians 1:20). This is the means for God’s ultimate plan of restoration and reconciliation – the redemption of His children and the redemption of His creation. This is how He is doing His work. We don’t always see it but its progress is unthwarted by all the forces of evil and rebellion – all that we see that is so very wrong.
 
So what is our part in this mission? Clearly Christ’s followers are to engage every nook and cranny of our culture. But how? Some would argue that it is primarily through political and social activism – we should dedicate most of our efforts in cultural redemption by trying to change our world from the outside in. I would say otherwise. Although we are to be involved in all of His creation (and that includes social and political activism), I’m of the persuasion that most of our resources and energy should be committed to changing our culture from the inside out. Again, how? By the heralding of the cross and the power of His blood. By being conformed to Jesus’ image and communicating His Good News. I believe our primary calling is the living and proclaiming of the Gospel.

To state it in overly simple terms, we should be more concerned with seeing His creatures (people) transformed by the shed blood of Christ and the power of the cross than we are who is running for Congress. For in focusing on the advance of the Gospel and the building of His true spiritual kingdom (which Jesus said is “not of this world”) we will be most effective in doing our part in His redemption and reconciliation of “all things.”

So let’s be ambassadors for Jesus by engaging those outside of Christ, no matter their domain. If God is willing and enough receive His salvation and embrace the truths of His Word, Congress and culture will soon fall in line. In other words, let’s not keep it to ourselves but actively connect with our culture and watch to see how God works in redeeming and reconciling all things to Himself…for His own glory!


“Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. And a person’s enemies will be those of his own household. Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.  And whoever does not take his cross and follow me is not worthy of me. Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it” (Matthew 10:34-39).

Christian Teens Tell Churches: Challenge Us, Don’t Water Down Gospel, Christian News

For years I’ve been saying that our watering down, liberalizing, and softening of the claims and demands of the kingdom of God (and the Gospel) is the problem with reaching our culture with the truth of Jesus. The false logic goes like this: “If we make receiving and following Jesus easy and palatable then more will choose to do so.” Not only is that awful theology and an inexcusable compromise but it doesn’t work either. People (youth in particular) are looking for something so extreme they are willing to “sell out” to it. Look at much of what our young people have become attracted to (such as Goth or gangs – there are a lot of ugly subcultures into which our youth are willing to submerge themselves) and see their passion once they commit to a lifestyle or “cause.”

People are looking for a radical calling to devote themselves. And there is nothing more outrageous than the claims of Christ and the demands of discipleship. Die to self, hate your life, take up your cross, sell all, lose your life that you might gain something far greater (Jesus) – these are the drastic messages of true, undiluted Christianity. And this is not only the truth but also what people or hungry for. They don’t long for some passionless, stoic, simplistic, easy, lazy, disengaged belief system. They don’t desire to just go through the motions of shallow religion. They want to live for something worth dying for!!! This article is just another reminder that our weak, fearful, faithless approach to reaching people is actually turning them off. They want the real deal, the real Jesus (the Lamb and the Lion), and His extreme calling. And the real Jesus is the real deal!

I think a personal story is in order. Several years ago at a Christian youth rally the leader of the band that was the focal point of the meeting concluded the service this way: “Please remain seated and don’t bow your heads. We are going to stop the music now. If you are interested in surrendering to Christ and following Him please stand. While everyone watches, please come forward. We would like to spend some time with you and more fully explain what receiving Jesus means.”

Out of an audience of over 2000, 3 young people stood.

The worship leader continued: “Now come to the front so that a counselor can spend some time with you. We want you to know why we are doing this. If you choose to follow Jesus tomorrow there will be no background music and all eyes will be on you to see if you meant what you said when you made this decision to give all of yourself to serve all of who He is – and rely upon Him to live the way He calls you to live.”

The 3 young people walked to the front and were greeted by counselors.

Can you imagine the uproar from pastors and youth leaders? They were livid! “The world makes it hard enough to become a Christian, we don’t need to make it any harder,” they screeched. “Last year,” one said, “we had dozens come forward.” The band leader softly and graciously replied, “I’m sure you did. And I’m also sure these 3 are more likely to continue in the faith.”

The thing that made such an impression on me, and I’ll never forget it, was what I learned when I spoke to all 3 of those kids. All had come to the front the year before. And they all said essentially the same thing: “It wasn’t real last year. It was pure emotion. It seemed like the popular thing to do. Now I have a better idea of what I’m signing up for, what it means to follow my Savior.”

And, I believe, follow they will.

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